Lil Durk Collaborates With Chicago’s New Mayor To “Save” Kids’ Lives

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Lil Durk recently met with Chicago’s new mayor Brandon Johnson to discuss different ways they can help save kids’ lives around his hometown.

Durk, also known as “The Voice,” is always looking for new ways to utilize his talents and contribute to the community that raised him.

Lil Durk
Instagram

Earlier this week, Smurk’s meet-up with Mayor Johnson created a buzz with the release of the teaser footage. Smurk promptly clarified that this was not a promotional tactic for his upcoming album “Almost Healed,” but rather a concerted effort to save the lives of kids in his city.

“It ain’t album promo it’s saving kids’ [lives],” he wrote in response to hecklers in DJ Akademiks’ comment section.

The Voice change the lives of multiple students at the Howard University with the development of his Durk Banks Endowment Fund.

Durkio and Amazon Music have partnered to award two Chicago-area students with $50,000 scholarships to attend the prestigious HBCU.

At the Lil Durk’s Neighborhood Heroes HBCU College & Career Preparedness Cohort Program, two students were chosen from a group of 20 participants. But he’s not just going to stop there. The Chicago native will also contribute $250,000 to Howard’s GRACE Award, a program that supports students in need of financial aid for tuition.

Sharing the news on his Instagram, Durk wrote: “I’m the voice this the part they don’t show, I appreciate all the kids who are struggling to finish school and needed this blessing.”

Lil Durk
HipHopX/LilDurk

In 2020, Durk launched his nonprofit organization Neighborhood Heroes and has steadily been giving back to his community in the years that followed.

Last year, it collaborated with the nonprofit Chicago Votes to provide 29,000 bottles of hand sanitizer to convicts and staff members of the Illinois Department of Correction’s correctional facilities. The project was started to combat the COVID-19 virus and the absence of potable water in the jail system.

“It’s obvious, those locked up or working at a correctional facility are going to be at a higher risk of exposure to COVID-19,” Durk said in a statement at the time. “At the end of the day, this disease ain’t to be played with, and everyone should have the basic hygiene necessities to help prevent catching this virus. It only made sense for my foundation (Neighborhood Heroes) to collaborate with Chicago Votes and IDOC.”